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Summer 2019 Course Offerings

Undergraduate Course Offerings

LIT 316-01/WGS 376-01 Global Women Writers
Professor: Mindi McMann
Course Meetings: This is a blended learning course. In person meetings will take place on Monday 2:00pm-4:50pm 
The course runs from June 17, 2019 to July 18, 2019

This course will explore various literatures from around the world, encouraging students to examine the politics of gender, culture, and nation as well as the intersections of those systems of power.  In exploring everything from arranged marriages to women in war, Global Women Writers will provide students – especially those students who have spent much of their lives within the borders of the U.S. – with one of the most challenging and rewarding courses of their college career.  Common themes include feminist politics, post- and neo-colonialisms, reproductive rights, translation, globalization, and activism.

 

LIT 374-01 American Literature to 1800
Professor: Michele Tarter
Course Meetings: This is a blended learning course. In person meetings will take place on Monday from 10:00am-1:00pm
The course runs during the Maymester: May 28, 2019 to June 14, 2019

This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to acquire a broad-based, foundational knowledge and understanding of early American literature. Emphasis will be placed on formulating a coherent understanding of the texts, contexts, concerns, and problematics which influenced American literature before 1865 and which continue to structure interpretations of the period.

 

LIT 499 Seminar in Research and Theory: Dystopian Literature 
Professor: Jean Graham
Course Meetings: Monday, Tuesday and Thursday 11:00am-12:20pm
The course runs from May 28, 2019 to July 18, 2019 (please note the meeting dates)

This seminar focuses on dystopian literature, especially those dystopian novels frequently taught at the secondary level. As dystopian literature critiques society, this focus will enable us to concentrate on gender and other cultural approaches to literature.

** This is an 8 week course spanning over the Maymester Session 1 and Session 2

 

Graduate Course Offerings

ENGL 650: American Literature to 1800
Professor:  Michele Tarter
Course Meetings: This is a blended learning course. In person meetings will take place Monday from 10:00am-1:00pm. This course runs during the Maymester: May 28, 2019 to June 14, 2019

This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to acquire a broad-based, foundational knowledge and understanding of early American literature. Emphasis will be placed on formulating a coherent understanding of the texts, contexts, concerns, and problematics which influenced American literature before 1865 and which continue to structure interpretations of the period.

 

ENGL 670: The Contemporary Short Story
Professor:  Jo Carney
Course meetings: Monday/Tuesday/Thursday 5pm to 7:30pm
This course runs from June 17, 2019 to July 18, 2019

Many of the most interesting voices in our current literary landscape are practitioners of short fiction. In this seminar we will explore the style and substance of a variety of short stories, a genre that has moved far beyond the maximalism v. minimalism and realism v. postmodernism divides of the late 20th century. We will begin with Donald Barthelme and Raymond Carver and then look at how the short story by writers today—including Chimamanda Adichie, Lydia Davis, Edward P. Jones, Ben Marcus, Karen Russell, and George Saunders—respond to earlier traditions.

 

ENGL 611: Medieval Literature
Professor: Felicia Steele
Course Meetings: Monday/Tuesday/Thursday 5pm to 7:30pm
This course runs from July 22, 2019 to August 22, 2019

In this course, we will read, analyze, and discuss literary and cultural texts from some of the major genres from this period from England, France, and Iceland: the saint’s life, the mystical treatise, the national or dynastic epic, the romance, the fable, the ars amatoria, the saga, and the fabliau. We will focus not only on generic character, but also on the presentation of women within those genres. To that end, we will read works written by women and about women, all
the while trying to determine to what degree these works were written for women.

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